Sunday, 23 December 2012

The Push For Przemysl Bridge - Final Part

Losing an Oberleutnant could have been disastrous for the Germans, as it meant the Wehrmacht would now have to allow their Order Hand to dwindle down to five instead of seven cards. Fortunately for von Rundstedt there was a “Feldwebel” (deputy platoon leader) who stepped up to the challenge and reduced this penalty by one card; the German Army could now only use a hand of six order/tactic cards.

Determined to take the central objective with Light Tanks, the German’s deployed another Panzer Mark I unit from its reinforcements. Accompanied by Waffen-SS, and Panzer Mark II tanks, the armoured fighting vehicles were driven straight towards the Russian Major and his Communists forces occupying the small hill.  

Battered by the combined incoming German fire, the Soviet Major declared his unit of Regulars as being the “Defenders Of Russia” so reducing his men’s fatigue. Unfortunately it was never going to be enough, as the nearby Waffen-SS concentrated their firepower upon the gallant unit and finally broke them; killing the Russian Major, and reducing the Red Army’s Command Hand by three order/tactic cards.

The battle was almost at an end, but a final unit of Russian Conscripts were in range of the now unoccupied Central Objective and clambered to the top of the hill. However, the ‘green soviet troops’ quickly faltered and momentarily retreated as the bullets of some nearby German Heer took a savage toll upon them. But this was the last chance for a Communist victory over Fascism and with almost the final move of the battle, the Conscripts grimly climbed back up the hill to secure an impressive victory against the Wehrmacht invaders.
 LATEST ADDITIONS: A THIRD T-70 LIGHT TANK (PENDRAKEN MINIATURES CODE SV16) COMPLETES A LIGHT TANK PLATOON FOR MY SOVIET TANKOVY BATALON. SEEN HERE APPROACHING SOME DAMAGED ‘DRAGON’S TEETH’ (CODE GR209).

Monday, 10 December 2012

The Push For Przemysl Bridge - Part Four

Having momentarily managed to push back the Russian Cavalry, the Wehrmacht Infantry unit had both enough time to treat some of their casualties with a “Medic” and the courage to then “Move And Fire” and push the Soviet Horse formation back eastwards even further.
THE GERMAN DEPLOYMENT LINE… FROM LEFT TO RIGHT: PANZER MARK III MEDIUM TANKS, PANZER MARK IB LIGHT TANKS, HEER, WAFFEN-SS, HEER AND PANZER MARK I LIGHT TANKS.

Unfortunately for Field Marshal von Rundstedt the Waffen-SS and the Panzer Mark III tanks were not doing so well; whilst watching the Russians deploy more Conscripts onto the battlefield (who promptly started marching west towards the central objective), these German forces came under fire from T-70 tanks and the Soviet Medium Mortar support unit (who had deployed a “Spotter”) and started to fall back themselves.

Realising that the T-70 Light tanks were close to spearheading a Soviet breakthrough through the centre of the battlefield, and emboldened by the deployment of Panzer Mark II tanks slightly to their north, the Waffen-SS threw themselves back into the fight using their “Doctrine & Training” and took full advantage of being the “Nazi Party’s Bully Boys” (which gives ‘any Waffen-SS unit shooting/assaulting a +1 dice modifier to represent them being well-equipped and highly motivated’). Despite the presence of an officer, the Russian Light Tanks completely broke under such a withering hail of bullets and the German’s had ‘clawed back’ a victory point under their scenario objectives (i.e. 1 VP per enemy unit destroyed).
THE RUSSIAN CAVALRY AND T-70 TANKS TAKE A BATTERING DUE TO THE “NAZI PARTY BULLY BOYS” AND THEIR “DOCTRINE & TRAINING”. BUT A “SURPRISE CHARGE” FROM THE SOVIET HORSEMEN CATCHES SOME HEER WITH ‘THEIR PANZERS DOWN’.

As the German Medium Mortar support team scored two hits upon the Russian T-26 tanks, it was clear to Marshal Budenny that the Wehrmacht were now keen to quickly eradicate the other Soviet armour formation off of the battlefield. Equally as worrying though was the sudden push of German Heer towards the central hill. There was nothing else for it, and despite their casualties and snorting horses, the Soviet Cavalry once again galloped forwards with a “Surprise Charge”. Unfortunately the Wehrmacht Infantry unit was simply too ‘fresh’ and having withstood the initial impact of the horsemen, the Heer gunned down the Russian riders to a man.

Clearly though the Russians were not going to easily allow the German Army to capture the central objective, so gunning their gasoline-fuelled six-cylinder Maybach HL 62 TRM engines, the northern unit of Panzer Mark II tanks rushed eastwards towards the farthest objective from the German lines. Careful to use the rough terrain in order to ‘protect’ their right flank from the Russian Cavalry (as only Infantry and tracked vehicles can cross rough terrain) the Light Tanks quickly came within firing range of the Russian Regulars encamped on the hill. But before they could fire on the Soviet infantry formation, the Panzer crews found themselves the victims of “FUBAR-Panic” and swiftly withdrew their armoured vehicles all the way back to the German deployment line.

All attention therefore once again fell on the central objective; a tiny hill partially surrounded by some mountains. Risking all, the German’s rushed forwards a badly beaten formation of Panzer I tanks, and momentarily took the hill.  However, the Russian Conscripts had finally reached the key strategic objective themselves and despite being ‘green’ broke the already fragile German Light Tank formation. With the hill in their control, the Soviets now needed only to expel any German forces from the adjoining terrain and wait for imminent nightfall… Marshal Budenny therefore ordered his Major to accompany a unit of Russian Regulars to support the Conscripts and hold the hill.

Unsurprisingly the Wehrmacht were never going to allow this to take place without a fight, and brought forward their Medium Tank unit in order for their 3.7 cm Kampfwagenkanone to be in range of any unit positioned on top of the central hill. Once accompanied by a unit of Heer of the Panzer Mark III tanks pushed east towards the Soviet Conscripts and unsurprisingly ejected the Russians from the hill.
PERFORMING AN “AMBUSH”, THE GERMAN PANZER MARK III MEDIUM TANKS CAPTURE THE CENTRAL OBJECTIVE, PUSHING BACK THE SOVIET CONSCRIPTS. THE FAR LEFT BLOB WITH ARMOURED CAR IS THE RUSSIAN MAJOR AND HIS RUSSIAN REGULARS.

Realising that the battle was lost should the German Army hold the hill; the Russian Major spurred on his Regulars and actually assaulted the German Medium tanks at close quarters. Inspired by their Commanding Officer’s communist bravado the Soviet soldiers forced the German Panzers to reverse off of the hill, but a unit of Wehrmacht Heer immediately replaced them. An intense firefight then took place with both Infantry formations suffering heavy casualties, but as the daylight started to fail the Germans still held the hill.  

Gambling there was still just enough time to take the battlefield’s key strategic objective, and then rid the surrounding terrain of any German units, the Major and his Russian Regulars fired again and again at the Heer holding the hill, and finally the Wehrmacht infantry unit broke. With the central objective now ripe for the taking, but still vulnerable to counter-attack from the German Panzer Mark III tanks, the Russian Medium Mortar team bombarded the Medium tanks and penetrated their homogeneous steel armour. As soon as the dust had settled the Russian Major, on the orders of an accompanying (“NKVD”) Commissar, charged his Regulars into the disorientated German tanks, amazingly breaking the medium armour formation.

Permanently discarding a Panzerkampfwagen Mark I Order“ so as to bring a unit of German Light Tanks onto the battlefield from his reinforcements (i.e. previously broken units that have been given time to reform off table), Field Marshal von Rundstedt immediately dispatched them, along with an Oberleutnant, towards the central objective. Fortunately the Russian Regulars were able to utilise “Opening Fire” before the armoured fighting vehicles crashed into them, and having been weakened by the Soviet fire, the German light tanks quickly broke once they engaged the Russian Infantry in close quarter fighting.

Tuesday, 4 December 2012

The Push For Przemysl Bridge - Part Three

THE RUSSIAN T-70 COMPANY, LED BY A SOVIET CAPTAIN, COMES UNDER HEAVY FIRE. WHILST TWO UNITS OF GERMAN HEER ACCOMPANY THE WAFFEN-SS (ALL IN WHITE SMOCKS) AS THEY PUSH TOWARDS THE RUSSIAN LINES.

With the German armour push momentarily abated, the Russians took the opportunity to counter-attack with their own Light Tanks. Their T-26 tanks, supported by medium mortar fire (as a result of the presence of an ‘NKVD’ officer) forced the Panzer company in the centre of the battlefield back even further towards the German deployment line. Encouraged by the urgent withdrawal of the German Mark I tanks, the Russians deployed more ‘Angels of Mercy’ to tend to the wounded crew of their T-70 tanks. And even as the female medics treated the injured, the Soviet Light Tanks opened up upon some Heer accompanying the Waffen-SS.
GERMAN PANZER MARK I TANKS APPROACH THE NORTH-EASTERN HILL, ONLY TO FIND THE OBJECTIVE IS OCCUPIED BY A UNIT OF RUSSIAN REGULAR SOLDIERS SUPPORTED BY A LIGHT MACHINE GUN TEAM.

Suddenly all attention focused on the Captain led Light Tank company, as the German Panzer Mark III’s moved ominously closer towards them, whilst ‘Doctrine & Training’ allowed the Waffen-SS Light Machine Gun Team to provide covering fire. Unfortunately the T-70 armour was penetrated and Russian casualties increased significantly with the decision that the vehicle was ‘On Fire’.

Fortunately the Light Tanks were declared the ‘Defenders of Russia’; a unique Soviet Army Tactic card that allows any unit suffering from its full quota of fatigue to automatically recover from one of its casualties. But then the nearby Panzer Mark I tanks performed a ‘Surprise Charge’ (which prevents an opposing player from deploying their own tactic cards as a response) and crashed into the Soviet armour formation, hoping to break the buckling tank crews. Grimly the battered T-70’s weathered the assault and, inspired by their heroic Captain, momentarily repulsed the German Light tanks. 
THE ‘DEFENDERS OF RUSSIA’ MOMENTARILY RECUPERATE BEFORE THEY ARE CAUGHT WITH THEIR PANZERS DOWN BY A GERMAN ‘SURPRISE CHARGE’. INSPIRED BY THEIR CAPTAIN THE SOVIET ARMOUR RESISTS THE GERMAN BATTERING.

Momentarily inspired by the defiance of their T-70 Light Tanks, the Russian Medium Mortar Team prepared to shell the approaching German forces further still, but fell victim of ‘FUBAR – Panic’, and attempted to retreat instead. Realising that a chance to bloody the German armour once and for all may be about to be lost, the Soviet Cavalry brigade spurred on their horses towards the Panzer Mark I tanks still licking their wounds amidst the rough terrain (see rocky terrain).

Disaster appeared to have momentarily struck when the German tanks declared ‘Opening Fire’ and seized the opportunity to fire upon the riders before they could engage them. One of the horses crumpled to the ground, but the Russians were ‘Fanatics’ and could therefore ignore the first casualty the unit suffered, as it didn’t have any fatigue at the time. Pouring submachine gun fire into the German Light Tanks the Soviet Cavalry quickly penetrated the weak armour and a further cheer went up as the hit set the tank ‘On Fire’. With more casualties than its fatigue quota would allow, the Panzer Mark I company broke and was removed from the battlefield.
 HORSE VERSES PANZER… THE GERMAN LIGHT TANKS MOMENTARILY HELD THE INITIATIVE BY ‘OPENING FIRE’, BUT THEN BROKE UNDER THE STRAIN OF THE RUSSIAN CAVALRY ‘FANATICS’ ASSAULT AND THE DAMAGE THAT IT CAUSED.

Furious at the loss of one of his Panzer Mark I companies, Marshal Gerd von Rundstedt ordered a counter-attack immediately, and whilst pushing a unit of Heer west to accompany his Panzer Mark III’s, he utilised ‘Doctrine & Training’, ‘Hitler’s Buzzsaw’ and ‘Nazi Party Bully Boys’ to sting the Waffen-SS into action and send a hail of bullets into the Soviet T-70 tanks. Amazingly the Russian armour formation remained intact, though another casualty would clearly break the beleaguered tanks crews.

Once gain the Soviet Cavalry took it upon themselves to lead the Red Army towards victory and charged into the Panzer Mark III tanks, submachine guns blazing. Bullets pinging off their armour, the German armour withdrew from the assault, providing the Heer a clear line of sight on the Russian horsemen. Once again ‘Hitler’s Buzzsaw’ tore into the Soviets and few survived the withering fire from the Light Machine Gun Team.
CHARGE OF THE SOVIET BRIGADE - HAVING DISPATCHED A COMPANY OF PANZER MARK I TANKS, THE RUSSIAN HORSEMEN ENGAGE SOME TOUGHER ARMOUR, BUT ARE WHITTLED DOWN BY A UNIT OF HEER AND ‘HITLER’S BUZZSAW’.

Monday, 3 December 2012

The Push For Przemysl Bridge - Part Two

Having already ‘taken’ the first objective, the Germans advanced towards the second hill (located in the centre of the battlefield) by moving forward their Panzer Mark I company. In order to support the Light Tanks the Wehrmacht deployed behind them more Heer along with an Officer-led Waffen-SS unit. Conscious of the ever-encroaching Russian Submachine Gun Troops to the South, the German Major fired his Machine Gun Team at the ‘close combat specialists’ in order for them to maintain their distance.    

Stung by the fatigue being suffered by the Shpagin machine pistol carrying soldiers, the Russians issued an ‘Angels Of Mercy’ order for nurses to be sent to the unit to aid the wounded (and remove one fatigue/casualty). The Submachine Gun Troops were less heartened though by the sight of the Panzer Mark I company trundling forwards and opening fire upon them. Despite the tanks being disadvantaged by ‘Restricted Field of Fire’ the Soviet unit was close to breaking, and only a withering salvo of Soviet fire by a nearby Russain Machine Gun Team, kept the German Light Tanks (protected by their ‘Schurzen Skirts’) at bay.

Eager to stretch the battlefield further, the German’s then deployed both another company of Panzer Mark I’s and a unit of Panzer Mark III’s up in the North, and pushed their Heer forwards towards the central hill, threatening the Russian T-70 tanks. Machine gun fire then ripped into the Soviet Light Tanks as the German infantry utilised ‘Hitler’s Buzzsaw’ to rack up some hits on the Russian Armour. Only the presence of the Soviet Officer stopped the tanks from falling back.
THE SOVIET SUBMACHINE GUN TROOPS TAKE A HAMMERING, WHILST A GERMAN PANZER MARK I COMPANY (CLOSE TO THE BLACK UNCOATED MOUNTAIN RANGE IN THE CENTRE OF THE BATTLEFIELD) UTILISES THE ‘REGROUP’ TACTIC.

Concerned by the presence of the Panzer Mark I’s close to the central hill, the Russian Regulars pumped even more machine gun lead into the German formation, taking the Light Tanks to the limit of their endurance and forced them to retreat away from the Soviet deployment line. Stunned by the Russian firepower, the German’s allowed the exhausted German armour time to ‘Regroup’ in order to reduce some of its fatigue/casualties.

Sunday, 2 December 2012

The Push For Przemysl Bridge - Part One

OPERATION BARBAROSSA – “The Push For Przemysl Bridge”
 This series of articles and battle reports (using a homemade quick play rule set inspired by “Memoir 44”, “Blitzkrieg Commander” and “Bolt Action”) will initially cover the Third Reich’s invasion of Russia from October – December 1941. The 10mm metal models and the majority of resin scenery are by “Pendraken Miniatures”. The ‘Hexon’ terrain boards are by “Kallistra” The paints used are predominantly from the “Games Workshop” (old) range.

Set at the beginning of Operation Barbarossa, the first engagement will concern the German Army pushing towards the Przemysl Bridge over the San.

Having decided to play a series of battles over the next few months to ‘test-out’ my card-driven homemade rule set, I thought the opening confrontation should be a simple battle on my 9 x 14 hex table, with both armies only fielding ten-eleven formations each, most of which will be infantry (of varying quality) with some German Panzer Mark I's and Soviet Light Tanks.

PART OF THE GERMAN ARMY’S STARTING HAND, INCLUDING AN ORDER FOR MEDIUM MORTARS, FELDWEBEL (WHO CAN ‘FILL IN’ FOR DEAD OFFICERS), SCHURZEN SKIRTS (BETTER ARMOUR FOR TANKS) AND PINNED (EXTRA FATIGUE/CASUALTY ON AN ENEMY UNIT).

The battlefield was predominantly open space, with an area of rough terrain to the North (see above rocky features), a small impassable mountain in the centre (see black blob) and an inland lake to the South (not shown). In order to allow for the objectives required for certain Scenario cards (drawn after set-up), a small hill was placed in the North East (see above), a similar sized hill in the South West (not shown) and a third hill (acting as a key strategic objective) in the centre, shielded on two sides by the impassable mountains.

The German Army drew its initial hand of seven order/tactic cards, as well as their Scenario card. Field Marshal Gerd von Rundstedt apparently wanted a ‘Point Defence’; meaning the German’s would need to have a formation located at each of the three objectives (hills) by the end of the battle. To do this, they had orders for Heer, a Panzer Mark I formation, and a Medium Mortar unit.

For the Russians Marshal Budenny ordered nothing less than total victory with ‘Hold Until Relieved’; meaning the Red Army must not only have a formation located on the key strategic objective (i.e. the hill in the centre of the battlefield) but could not allow any enemy formations to be located on an adjoining piece of terrain. This all or nothing scenario was somewhat easier than normal because two of the adjoining hexes were impassable. To begin with the Soviets had access to Regulars, Submachine Gun Troops and Cavalry.

The Germans started by deploying a unit of Heer Infantry near to the South West hill objective. This unit was accompanied by the Army’s Commanding Officer, a Major. This meant these soldiers would fight especially hard and rarely give ground when under fire, but at the risk of the Officer being killed and the German Army’s order/tactic hand being reduced by three cards (unless a Feldwebel could step up to the mark and decrease the commanding officer’s loss by one card).

With subsequent orders the Germans deployed their medium mortar unit and a company of Panzer Mark I’s. In addition they used the tactic card ‘Doctrine & Training’ to order their Major’s Heer unit further eastwards beyond the hill so it’s machine gun team covered the entire inland lake. This tactic is unique to the German Army and allows a second unit (providing it’s Infantry) to be moved/fight without the need for it to be specifically ordered (i.e. the unit uses its initiative to make a move).
  THE GERMAN ARMY DEPLOYS AROUND THE SOUTH WEST HILL OBJECTIVE (UNDERCOATED BLACK). THE MAJOR’S COMMAND TRUCK CAN BE SEEN WITH THE HEER HE ACCOMPANIES. THE GERMAN’S MEDIUM MORTAR FORMATION IS ALSO VISIBLE.

In response, the Russians ordered a unit of their Regulars to deploy and take the hill to the North East (not shown), and deployed their Cavalry (see the black undercoated hex tile), Submachine Gun Troops, more Regulars, Conscripts and T-26 Light Tanks along the centre of their battle line. 

Friday, 30 November 2012

Pendraken Dwarves Armed With Axes

With my painting slowly progressing on my Lifeguard Cuirassier unit, I've momentarily turned my attention towards a 'spot of fantasy' and based twenty Dwarves, predominantly taken from the “Pendraken Miniatures” code FD6. Initially purchased as part of a substantial pre-show “Warfare” order two years ago, the axe carrying dwarves were bought in order to play a series of 10mm games using the “Mantic Games” rule set “Kings Of War”. However the rather large project (also involving Elves) never really got going past this first small regiment of dwarves.

Sunday, 18 November 2012

Saturday, 10 November 2012

Work In Progress: Pendraken Cuirassiers

I've finally finished painting my first wing of King’s Lifeguard Musketeers. The 24 English Civil War 10mm models by “Pendraken Miniatures” have taken me approximately a fortnight to complete, rather longer than I anticipated. But they now only require basing before they’re ‘table ready’.
To be honest the slight problems I've had painting some of these models has made this mini painting project a somewhat disheartening experience, so before I turn my attention to the second wing of Foot Battle Line, I'm going to temporarily turn my attention towards painting a small unit of cavalry for the Royalist Army’s Battalia of Horse. This unit of Heavy Horse will consist entirely of models from code EC11 Cuirassier; with the 12 horsemen forming the Royalist army’s single Lifeguard Cuirassier unit.

Saturday, 3 November 2012

Further Work In Progress: Pendraken Musketeers

I'm close to finishing the painting on my first unit of 24 Royalist English Civil War Musketeers for “Pike & Shotte” by “Warlord Games”. Consisting of a mixture of 10mm models from "Pendraken Miniatures" codes EC3 Musketeers, Cap and EC14 Musketeers, Hat, this foot battle line is proving rather ‘tough going’ though as a result my difficulty in painting the ‘forward firing’ pose models.
In addition I'm being distracted with my 30mm models (see http://fantorical.blogspot.co.uk/).  

Saturday, 27 October 2012

Work In Progress: Pendraken Musketeers

I've started painting the first of two units of 24 Royalist English Civil War Musketeers for my planned games of “Pike & Shotte” by “Warlord Games”. These models are based upon the usual 20mm x 30mm green plastic stands I use for all my 10mm infantry. I plan for these ‘two wings of shot’ to be made up of a mix of 10mm models from "Pendraken Miniatures" codes EC3 Musketeers, Cap and EC14 Musketeers, Hat. In addition I'll be using the lovely models from their code EC5 Foot Command to represent the Foot Battle line’s officers, drummers and standard-bearers. I don't though plan to have them actually carry any flags. 
As with the company’s Pikemen, all the models are going to be predominantly painted using “Vallejo” Heavy Red and Heavy Ochre; the colours of the King's Lifeguard. So once complete these ‘Lincolnshire men’ will form the first regiment of the Royalist Battalia of Foot.

I'm certainly happy painting up the Musketeers 'at rest' loading or simply holding their Matchlock Muskets  upright, and have already managed to get a fairly reasonable factory production line painting process going for them. Indeed, with their different head wear breaking up the monotony I believe they're one of my favourite 10mm models to paint. 

Unfortunately I can't say the same for those leant forwards firing their muskets. I spent three nights painting just one of the little fellows (on and off) during the week, and still don't feel entirely happy with the final results. Unlike their fellow Musketeers, I need to concentrate on painting these miniatures one at a time, thus I've turned to some 30mm plastic models (see over at http://fantorical.blogspot.co.uk) to keep me going whilst I wait for their paint to dry. As you can imagine this is making the Foot Battle Lines somewhat slow going, although I have been encouraged in that I only need 9 such models per wing.

Sunday, 21 October 2012

Captain Robert Leven's ECW Command Stand

Painting is going really well on my 10mm English Civil War project but then they always seem to in the opening week. I've completed my first unit of Royalist English Civil War Pikemen, having finished basing a further two stands of Pike and the block's Command base as well. I've used three of the excellent models from "Pendraken Miniatures" code EC5 Foot Command to represent the Elite Pike Unit's officer, drummer and standard bearer.
The officer's colour scheme is based upon that of the King's Lifeguard of Foot officer depicted on the cover of "Soldiers of the English Civil War (1) Infantry" by "Osprey Publishing". As with the Pikemen the model was initially undercoated with Vallejo Gunmetal Grey, washed with Black Shade, and then had his armour and sword dry brushed with more Gunmetal Grey. His civilian clothing was painted with Vallejo Heavy Blue and then washed with Blue Shade. As apparently the fellow's sash should be in the 'General's colours' I painted it Heavy Red to show him being in the King's service. I picked out his boots  with Heavy Ochre and then washed them with Umber Shade.

Both the drummer and standard bearer were painted along similar lines to that of the armoured pikemen, with just a couple of variations. Those who've previously seen me 'wrestle' with 28mm Napoleonic French drummers will appreciate how I struggle painting the cording, drum skin etc convincingly with my preferred 'black outline style'. So I 'cheated' again by simply painting the entire instrument with Heavy Ochre. A wash of Umber Shade (which is quickly becoming my trusty "Games Workshop" Devlan Mud replacement) hopefully brings out the detail of the drum's ropes etc.

The standard bearer has had some minor conversion work done on his flag pole, in order for it to accomodate the rather large flag depicting the officer (and company) to be Captain Robert Leven. I originally purchased the range of 10mm flags sold by "Pendraken Miniatures" but found these to have a few gaps in their range, most notably King Charles' Royal Banner. In addition, although nice, they simply didn't do the job for me and seemed a bit small and fiddly. If there's one thing I like about the English Civil War its the huge flags that the men carried into battle. Thus I've turned to 15mm and although they are a tad larger than was probably normal, you can certainly see who is who on the battlefield.

Because of the larger size I did consider making my own, and there are some good websites out there that either offer free flags or provide detailed templates/guides for you to make them yourself. However I went down the far easier, though rather expensive avenue, of purchasing a page each of Royalist and Parliament 15mm flags from Richard Lowles and "Battle Flag". These flags look excellent, arrived very promptly and were extremely well packaged. But at just under a tenner a sheet they're a lot of money for essentially a page of printing. Doubtless you pay for the time it took to create the flags in the first place. 

Saturday, 20 October 2012

English Civil War Royalist Pikemen

These Royalist English Civil War Pikemen are all from "Pendraken Miniatures" code EC1 Armoured Pike and have been painted to represent the King's Lifeguard. They were all initially undercoated with Vallejo Gunmetal Grey and then washed with Black Shade. I then dry brushed their armour, helmets and swords with more Gunmetal Grey. Their coat sleeves and breeches were painted with Heavy Red and washed with Red Shade. Their gloves were picked out with Heavy Ochre and their Pikes, stockings and footwear were painted with Heavy Sienna. All of these areas were washed with Umber Shade. Finally I used Heavy Skintone of their faces before applying a wash of Fleshtone Shade.
As I ultimately plan to use the “Pike & Shotte” rule set by “Warlord Games” for my English Civil War battles I decided to mount these models on a 20mm x 30mm base. With this in mind I’ve decided that a standard sized unit of 10mm Pike should consist of 36 models. As a result I plan to paint up another 18 Pikemen in order to complete the unit, although I plan for one stand to utilise some of the excellent Foot Command models “Pendraken Miniatures” manufacture in order to represent the unit’s leader Captain Robert Levens.

In order to represent an Elite Pike unit for “Pike & Shotte”, I plan for this entire unit of the King's Lifeguard to only consist of the armoured pikemen from code EC1. Hopefully that will make them stand out enough on the battle table.